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in someone who has contributed to san francisco either through their work or given back to the environment through culture, through arts and through many of the hard work and we will unveil who will receive this dedication today. as many of you know trees are very important for our communities. they provide us shade, they deter water from going into our storm systems, they provide a place for birds and butterflies and of course they help us clean our air. arbor day is a very important event. it is celebrated not just in america, but all over the world and i'm honored that we are kicking this event. i would like to thank the mayor for bringing arbor day back to san francisco. this is our 8th arbor day. i will welcome mayor lee to the stage. >> thank you the dpw, the recreation department, to all of those who helped us in working today. arbor day, it is an annual celebration that we have struggled very hard to make sure this city appreciate because the trees are part of a great answer and solution to reducing carbon emissions and be sure we have greenery and beautification for our citizens.
trading environment which the soldiers and police entering the service -- to give them some capacity initially to read and write and to make their numbers at first grade level -- havey over half of the asnf the capacity to read in the first grade level. to continue to emphasize the continued learning of the afghan soldiers and police threw up a period of time of their enlistment. this becomes not just an initiative which is useful for military and police operations, it is an initiative that has the potential to change society in many suspects -- in many respects. this has the potential for some pretty dramatic change. >> across the country i think there were other important outcomes of where we found the asnf in 2011 to where we are today. the securing of large segments of the population -- you wrote about it with michelle in a very good piece with respect to what you discovered. i travel inis when my battlefield circulation during the final months in afghanistan i tended to visit more of the afghan forces that our forces. i wanted to see how they were doing, how their command in con
has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> people are already lining up outside the sueme court building in washington trying to get front row seats to legal history. the court takes up same-sex marriage in less than two days. justices will hear arguments for the first case tuesday involving california's proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage. the second case centers on the defense of marriage act which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. as the supreme court prepares to tackle that issue, same-sex couples across the country are watching. cnn's joe johns has a story of a couple, one couple in the d.c. area, who are hoping history will be made. >> reporter: the battle over same-sex marriage in california has been going on for years, and coming up this week it finally arrives at the u.s. supreme court. we talked to one of the coupl
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
and their way of exploring their environment which is to use their mouth which, unfortunately, is full of really sharp teeth and mounted on top of several thousand pound of powerful fish. they bite on to things to find out what they are, and in this case it's possible there really was no malice intended here, that the animal was simply exploring the environment and probably gave a bit of a fright, too, when if managed to get stuck in the cage. >> so the great white shark, one of the most dangerous species in the world, i guess if you're in its environment, why would anyone want to get this close to it? >> it's a thrill-seeking activity, no doubt about that. what a magnificent animal but it is true that this species is responsible for more attacks on humans, more fatal attacks on humans more than any other shark species and you've got a much better chance of being struck by lightning than being attacked the by a shark in an unprovoked fashion. in this situation you have to wonder how unprovoked that situation was when you're using bait to attract animal to you in the first place. that create an u
. capitalism is predicated on unlimited growth, but we live in a finite environment and we seem to have a dysfunctional democracy unable to resolve that contradiction. how do you see climate change and our diminishing natural resources such as fossil fuels and water impacting this crisis in capitalism? >> capitalism is a system geared up to doing three things on the part of business: get more profits, grow your company and get a larger market share. those are the driving bottom line issues. corporations are successful or not if they succeed in getting these objectives met. that's what their boards of directors are chosen to do, that's what their shareholders expect. that's the way the system works. if along the way they have to sacrifice either the well-being of their workers or the well-being of the planet or the environmental conditions, they may feel very bad about it, and i know plenty of them who do. but they have no choice. and they will explain if they're honest that that's the way this system works. so we have despoiled our environment in a classic way. that's why we have huge c
. >> reporter: the deal brings environment environmentally friendly event event event research center. samsung is already in austin where employees are 2500 and is expanding their plant. >> more smaller size company to come to get closer to samsung, to get closer to the cyst co. i think in the long run it's a benefit to san jose. >> the city says it's not giving anything away except future tax breaks. >>> on tuesday the supreme court will hear a challenge to proposition 8. the voter passed initiative defines marriage between a man and a woman. >> when we talk about fund meantlized as related to the constitution we're talking about those sacred of all the rights we have. the united states supreme court describes it as such. >> a challenge to the federal defense of marriage act will be heard this week. there was a rally in new york today. >> reporter: people are camping out in front of the supreme court. tuesday they focus on california's proposition 8. wednesday the court looks at the constitution natural
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of
and coming to the environment to relax and enjoy. >> thank you very much. and i was wondering if you could talk about what kind of community out reach you have done? >> well, we followed the guidelines for abc all of the procedures and instructions that find us such as putting in 390 day notice and mailing out residential. as far as out reaching, again, very new to this process, so i didn't know that i had to do any of that. but of course, if there are things that we need to do, i will make sure that we will do that to the best of our ability and just get this thing smoothly and you know, going. >> have you worked with the district supervisor kim in her office? >> no. the only person that i have really been in contact with carolina at abc and i believe that i talked to inspector gordon at the police department and they made us sign and understand the rules and regulations as far as we know and the type 42 beer and wine license. >> thank you. >> thank you mr. chen. if we could hear from inspector? good morning, rich van cal representing the san francisco police department. eagle club indoor
the highway. >> she walked quite a distance in a very, very threatening environment. it is very blackout here and very dark. it is very steep. it is brushy and there is also coyotes in the background. to someone who was raised in a more urban environment as opposed to a rural setting that can be quite intimidating. >> the girl's father died from his injuries, but she escaped from the crash and her trek through the wilderness with a few cuts and bruises. >>> a round of nasty weather forced the cancellation of a professional golf tournament in florida. look how dangerous conditions were with strong wind gusts and even blowing over the large media center. tense moments after it was evacuated. the storm put a damper on tiger woods' golf game. suspending play. woods only got in two holes thus delayed play until tomorrow. the tornado warning was issued, but there are no confirmed sight ings tonight. and for the weather here in the bay area, let's get to leigh glaser who is tracking what is ahead. >> right now live doppler 7hd and we are not picking up any returns at all, but we are starting to see
in that environment. in fact, the plaintiff, the proponents' expert, mr. blankenhorn, testified that the children in those relationships would be better off. that we would be a better country, we would be closer to the american ideal, if same-sex marriage were permitted. now, it's easy to say those things. that you have to have, you have a better situation where a child is in, with a, with a mother and a father, but allowing, the other problem with that is that the, the remedy doesn't fit the so-called problem. in other words, restricting marriage to people of opposite sex doesn't mean that there won't be people in same-sex marriages. that california permits that. and the court, there is something like 37,000 children in same-sex households in california today. there are also 18,000 same-sex marriages which are not at issue in this case. it's easy to say that children would be better off in that relationship but if you have heterosexual relationships permitted in california and marriages between persons of the same sex, it doesn't change where the children will be raised. if a child is a product
. that is operated on by the environment and health choices. the genome, now revealing a lot of its secrets to us, is helping us to nail down what that heredity looks like and how we may learn enough about it to influence outcomes, so if you are born with a high risk of alzheimer's, maybe there is something you can do about it before you get the disease. >> when you sent christopher hitchens, what did he do in st. louis? >> he was examined by the cancer experts. they conducted dna analysis from his blood, and that could tell you the dna he was born with, and then they could look at the specific dna in the cancer cells.cancer is a disease in the genome. cancer comes about because of mistakes in the dna you are born with, causing them to grow when they should not, and in his cancer genome, they found a dozen or so mistakes that were acquired during life that were driving those cells to grow, and at least one of those not previously described suggested the possibility of using a therapy you would not normally have contemplated for esophageal cancer, so there was a chance to try something that was ra
kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ...it's my job to look after it. the words are going this way-there's no way. oh, the lights came on. isn't technology supposed to make life easier? at chase we're pioneering innovations that make banking simple. deposit a check with a photo. pay someone with an email. and bank seamlessly with our award-winning mobile app. take a step forward... and chase what matters. >>> welcome back to nbc bay area. can anyone stop the stanford cardinals? get this. the women's basketball team rolled through the pac-12 en route to their seventh consecutive conference title, and 26 consecutive tournament appearance. the top seed in spokane region, stanford earned the right the host the first round game at maples pavilion. number 16 seed, tulsa was in. and they were down to fight this afternoon. into the
flying about 70 satellites. so we're pretty familiar with the space environment and the risks it entails. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. s
that they may create and raise in the best environment. >> reporter: the other case presents a challenge to doma, the defense of marriage act, passed by congress 17 years ago. it blocks federal recognition of same-sex couples in states where they are allowed to marry denying them 1,000 federal benefits that other married couples get. it's being challenged by 83-year-old edie windsor of new york when they are spouse died and left her the estate, she got a tax bill for $360,000. >> if the federal government recognized the marriage it would have been zero. >> reporter: president obama now says it is unconstitutional. >> the basic principle that america is founded on, the idea that we're all created equal, applies to everybody. regardless of sexual orientation. >> reporter: house republicans are now defending doma in court. >> the administration doesn't get to decide what's constitutional. the supreme court does. and our financing a lawsuit was to make sure that the proper forum was used to make sure we know what's constitutional and what isn't. >> reporter: the court hears the doma case on wednesda
that made this environment possible. >> smith was the director of the whole school, right. for many years he took over after elizabeth irwin died. >> right. [inaudible] a couple years after she died. he was asked if he had communist teachers and he told them it was none of their business. >> that's right. and he was more than i think being a sort of old left sort of new york fellow, she was a new england yankee sort of the high. not necessarily liberal, a more independent yankee. they don't talk about him a lot. angelo spoke about him very fondly because she remembers that when she first came to the school, she came a week before the school opened, to sort of get oriented with the people who were -- who she was staying with and she just remembers him smiling at her and being very courtly and proper which i think was, you know, a good reminded her of the south because it was just amazing to her when she went around to that teachers and she was calling him by their firstname and they were in jeans. she said i think maybe i made a horrible mistake. maybe my mother was right. [laughter] >> did t
. the department of transportation, explosive devices take place, some indicators in environment, are you looking for any type of unattended packages or boxes in high risk areas, liquids, mist -- this is going to be a biological or chemical release. numerous sick or dead animals or birds. any objects that does not seem right, do you want to touch it? i'm not sure what this is, let me jostle it around. no, no, don't do that. move away and report it. remember that. a cell phone, a call, calling 911, using your cell phone may detonate that device. so obviously don't use your cell phone. go to a hard wire phone, land line phone, outside, and call 911. what do we do as first responders. when we come up do we use our walkie talkies or radio? no. you go to a hard wire phone, call it in and get the information back because it may detonate that using the radio frequency. remember we talked about suspected terrorism is a stop sign for you as nerts. you do not want to get hurt. any questions on the terrorism? bnice is not nice. incident takes place, it takes place here on the left side, this is called the h
advertisementing environment and sf travel really helped convene this whole effort to come up with environmentally friendly alternative. there is a big press release coming out soon about triple a's efforts to provide new materials for outdoor advertising. sf travel really a great organization and they really understand that small business helps make san francisco a unique place to come. and supporting the neighborhoods and trying to promote the neighborhoods through their newly revamped visitor's center at the powell street station. near holiday plaza. they did a beautiful job. the architectural makeover and they are some great info graphics there and volunteers who are helping tourists and locals alike to find out more about the city. >> i would also like to add to that, sf travel is going to be introducing a new part of their website, which will be great for our commercial corridors. which is that they would like the merchants associations to create itineraries, and they will be linking our itineraries for our different neighborhoods onto their website and they are creating a whole new section
to tenants that it's worth paying more for a retrofit unit. we need all stake holders in the environment to receive that. >> thank you very much. next speaker? >> good afternoon supervisors, my name is michael wills. i'm an architect and earthquake safety group. i speak in favor of this program because it shows a common sense foresight to have an ordinance that offers and approach to strengthening, financing and a sensitivity to keeping people in their homes. after seeing and working with the details on patrick's committee, i think the city can be proud of this ordinance. it's one that has been drafted with care to all the concerns and not only of the technical seismic committee, technical and seismic professionals, but to the real sense itivity and keeping people in their homes and bringing the financial along with it shows that this is a program that will take care to make sure that all have access to the things that we all wants which is to make a safer, more residue resilient city. so i strongly urge this. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> good afternoon supervisors, my name
? this is not an environment that we want to raise the children in. you know? the drug dealers, the constant drunkenness, the public defication. every time that i walk down the walk i have to look down to make sure that i am not stepping in anything. it is not a good quality of life other than, you know, it being an exciting neighborhood. but you know, these every-day little things just walking down the street and dodging you know, ex-cra meant piles is not how i want to live and i am investing in the neighborhood. i have bought there. but, you know, this is just the beginning. and i really, really support this. i also work in oakland and i go to the travis and i have seen the change in old oakland when the travis first came and there was not much. but now if you go down there, in old oakland, there are all of these small shops and it just creates a small vibrant neighborhood that people actually frequent. so, i do support this as a resident and as a planner. thank you. >> thank you. >> next speaker? >> good morning, supervisors. my name is (inaudible) day and i came to support this because i lived in t
, very threatening environment, it's very black out here, very dark. bill: a child escaping a crash, but finding herself in new danger when she's forced to find help in the dead of night. heather: and the future of the republican party, karl rove weighing in, why he is saying, don't give up just yet. bill: 10:30 in new york. karl rove over the weekend arguing that the republican party isn't over just yet, shooting down any suggestion that the party is past its praoeup. >> let's be clear, before we assign the republican party to the dust bin of history, 30 out of 50 governors in the united states are republicans. republicans have elected in 2010 the largest number of state legislators since 1920. the majority of state legislators are republicans. we have two robust parties, each with their own problems. the republican party has its problems, the democratic party has its problems and we are likely to see a competitive, political environment for decades to come. bill: i want to talk about this with former arizona senator jon kyl, a fox news contributor. welcome back here. >> thanks, go
water. environment minister peter altmaier says the government will form a panel to review the plan. members will include people from environmental groups and religious organizations. they'll draw up guidelines to help the government choose a candidate site by the end of 2015. they're going to reconsider gorleben as a possible location for the nuclear waste. >>> german leaders are also working to shut down the plants that churn out that waste. they want all of their country's nuclear reactors to be offline by 2022. the accident at japan's fukushima daiichi plant encouraged their decision. as nhk world shows us, the decommissioning process is long and dangerous. >> reporter: the nuclear plant was once a source of power for homes across the eastern part of germany. 1 in 10 households got their energy from the complex. the plant began operations in 1973. it generated energy for about 20 years. in 1990, safety concerns prompted the government to order all five reactors to be shut down. crews started the decommissioning process five years later. it took them another ten years to remove a
should not be in the hustle and bustle of the urban environment. there were very restrictive. they tried to say you had to have certain setbacks and you could not use buildings for other than the residents, and you could not be a minority unless you had permission. that was a big problem. >> they are still here. you can see this place. >> i am not positive i know where this is. can you aureate me? >> that is ocean avenue on the bottom left. the center line of that is myrmar ave. what is there that anybody would know? there are two gates. on the monterey side, there's a beautiful ornamental gate that welcomes people. all bungalows. >> what do you mean by that? >> traditionally, it is all on of little half story -- it is up on a little half story. they are smaller homes. there were supposed to be within reach of the average working man. >> architecturally, the bomb blows -- bungalows were derived from craftsman style and affected by the mission revival. this is a very attractive neighborhood. for years, i would appraise in this neighborhood and think, these homes are lovely. they have fair
have to really keep in mind is time. and schedule. we are now in a escalation area, environment and these construction cycle and to back up too far to redesign needs to be studied heavily and there are things that can be done and that was the last part of the recommendation is that we need to look at deeper in the bids to understand what is driving us being over budget to look at what would be potential redesign opportunities and repackaging in different ways to gain additional competition. many times i have seen the people step back and say let's redesign something saying that we can do xmillion doing this. we redesign and put it out for bid and because we are in an escalation cycle, it is the same cost and you have less value. >> it is a complicated question, i know that you are looking for something quick. >> you are going to try to get or rethink the steel package. >> we want to investigate deeply with the current bidder and understand his pricing structure throughout and we want to look at what the next steps would be to make a recommendation. >> are there any other package
, they are living in a good environment. they have family. my son is about to graduate from college. and my major interest in this is to contribute my experience and my knowledge as to families in the people besides the paperwork and information that i can get from the mental health board, and especially to work with the hispanic community. i speak spanish and be able to help them to not only to get the right care for the families who are mentally ill, also to help them to prevent, to get big problems, especially with bipolar disorder, that they can be very well managed if we go to the right places. the right medication and everything that gets involved in this matter. so, my position will be to advise and to get involved with the community in san francisco with the whole community. i know most of the hispanic community are not very well informed, especially with mental illness issues. so, i would like to contribute to that as well. >> thank you. >>> if you have any questions -- >> any questions? seeing none, thank you very much, ms. flores. >> thank you. next person is melody daniel. >>> good af
and the children they may create and raise in the best environment. >> reporter: the second case challenges defense of marriage act, blocks federal recognition of same-sex couples in states they are allowed to marry. edie windsor had to pay $363,000 in estate taxes when her partner died. >> i couldn't believe they were making a stranger of the person i lived with and loved for 42 something live. >> president obama now calls the law unconstitutional. house republicans are defending it in court. a new pew research center shows the majority of americans now support gay marriage. researchers say it shows the largest change in opinions on a policy issue in a decade. in washington i'm danielle lee, nbc news. >>> moving on to business, shares in yahoo! hit a new 52-week high this morning. the company bought a new startup as well. scott mcgrew joins us. you were thinking about young ceos but in this case very young. >> he just turned 18. he invented something, he and as a 17-year-old. yahoo! bought his company lock, stock, and barrel. we don't know the exact price but it's in the few tens of millions of do
of trading. keep that in mind. it's a fabulous environment. last week's other four ipos were up 14% to 20% on the first day. all the tech names work so well. that's why i wanted to introduce you to a new company. it's called pinnacle foods. it's a house of food brands. some say b&g expecting to become public on thursday. pinnacle is a company you never heard of, i bet. but your products can be found in 85% of american house holds. you would recognize their brands. they've got a big frozen food business with bird's eye frozen vegetables, mrs. paul's seafood, lender's bagels, celeste pizza, as well as hungry man frozen meals which i thought looked like a delicious heart attack in a box. and pinnacle has a grocery business. you know them as duncan hines, cookie and cake miss, mrs. butterworth, log cabin, comstock pie filling. as we know from hines from its all-time high last month, iconic brands are the landmark. blackstone is ringing the register on its investment taking the company public. recent history suggests these deals are performing extremely well. case in point, since the beginning
the way for providing clean energy? san francisco and what that does for the environment and i want to make sure we are looking at every single issue as it relates to job opportunities and for those persons who maybe the industry may change or not exist anymore and we are not just ignoring that sector. thank you. >> thank you, commissioner court -- >> thank you. these jobs are coupled together. supervisors breeds comments and supervisor avalos, i don't think they would suffer some job loss, but i think the key is whether there is a net job loss or net job gain. i'm hoping we'll have a robe us discussion about exactly what that build looks like and how we plan to pay for it and how many jobs are gained by the cca and the roll out that we have been discussing for several months. >> thank you. commissioner victor? >> yes. i just want to respond to the comment that torres said about the the job question and this goes back to hearing the survey because there is a question about the roll out and there is an appetite for a local build out that would generate jobs. even how many jobs woul
own environment and house and recovery and your neighbors are doing the same the city as a whole will be a more resilient city. >> we are all proud of living in san francisco and being prepared helps us stay here. >> so, thank you so much for joining us today, alicia, i appreciate it. >> absolutely, it is my pleasure. >> and thank you for joining us on another edition of building >>> good afternoon and thank you for coming. i'm delighted to announce that our first effort is unleashed upon the world. [ applause ] . it's only been two-and-a-half years since the moment of conception of this idea. it's an amazing tribute to our community. it reached three levels of impossibility, of getting a permit and designing it and putting it on this structure and the impossibility of getting it funded. it really is a tribute to so many and a lot of faces that i'm looking at this room tonight. it comes down to as always people. i'm going through a few moments here to give a real thanks to people who made this night and the next two years possible. i'm going to list a couple of company names,
will be a long-term problem. ashley: as long as this goes on, doug, we talk about the goldilocks environment but it is exactly what it is. it is not too hot to prompt the fed to pull back on its qe. but it is not too cold to push the economy into a recession. so kind of of in this same environment. how long do you think this could last? >> i don't buy the goldilocks analogy because we are in a low to zero growth. fourth quarter gdp in the u.s. is still zero. corporate profits in the third quarter were negative. we're slightly positive now. but first quarter consensus is negative again. where is goldilocks? only the fed stimulus, the fed is protecting a really tight monetary stance by u.s. congress, raising taxes, and, no, i don't see goldilocks at all. tracy: goldilocks is arguably uncle ben, right? he is not going anywhere anytime soon, right? i could make a argument, sell in may, do away thing doesn't count this year. >> i agree with that one, uncle ben. i hadn't heard that before. ultimately it i is pushing on a string. you need to have private economy, you need u.s. corporations, you nee
sense. in the immediate environment we're in today, one of these media campaigns can be a flash in the pan. but i think this is a long game and think it's a long game for good reason. i actually disagree with the governor that these politicians are necessarily being stupid. by going against the public on the issue. because this is one of those asymmetrical issues. most people are in favor of universal background checks, but the people who care about it are going to vote on the issue, are disproportion eige porgportiona opposed to them. i think we need to convince voters who are in favor of background checks to hold politicians accountable for their votes on it i think it's supportable, because violent crime has been in decline for 20 years -- >> not gun-related crime. >> i want to talk about that. finish your point first. >> i think the reason that the political environment is actually more difficult for gun control now than it was 20 years ago is because people are less afraid of violent crime than they used to be. and so i think it takes some convincing to tell people no reall
here in charlotte, north carolina, in a television environment, what if i'd have sat there and said, "you're not gonna get my thousand?" but i let go of what i could see and god let go of something i couldn't see. we signed contracts. bill gaither sent me an incredible check. nbc, they made a movie using some of my songs. and i liked that check. the difference between seasons is often a seed. a seed is not losing. it's investing a part of today into my future. it's moving a piece of now into tomorrow. i have no idea why i'm so stirred to pray for 300. but in the next 17 minutes, and i want them to do a countdown for 17 minutes, after i finish my prayer. i have no idea why that's so electrifying to my spirit. but i feel like there's gonna be a 17-minute window. and god is going to prove who he is in your life. if you can't trust god with your money, why would you trust him with your life? if god would lie to you about your money, why would you even believe the word of god? everything i have -- a man asked me one time, he said, "mike, what got you sowing thousand dollar seed?" i said,
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
will make the environment better. we had approximately 1,000 overflows occur in 1999. today, we've reduced overflows by 45% to 50%. and it's going to continue to improve as we go forward with the rehabilitation program that's required under the consent decree. narrator: an important piece of the program is the construction of an 8-mile-long storage tank that will significantly decrease combined sewer overflows. man: right now, we're at the bottom of the rockdale construction shaft. we're 310 feet below grade, deep under atlanta in hard rock. in the downtown area of atlanta, the sewer system and the stormwater system are combined and there are overflows during storm events, and so the purpose of this system is to relieve that flow, take it into the tunnel, transport it to a brand-new treatment plant, clean up the chattahoochee river. narrator: instead of the combined sewage overflowing into the river, it will flow into this tunnel that acts as a storage tank. the water will then slowly empty into the new plant for treatment before it's released back into the river. man: the system in total
to control your own environment and house and recovery and your neighbors are doing the same the city as a whole will be a more resilient city. >> we are all proud of living in san francisco and being prepared helps us stay here. >> so, thank you so much for joining us today, alicia, i appreciate it. >> absolutely, it is my pleasure. >> and thank you for joining us on another edition of building >> good afternoon. i'm with the department of building inspection. we are approaching the sixth year of our brown bag lunch series here at the department of building inspection where we talk about topics related to construction in san francisco. we invite you to join us on the third thursday of every month here at the building department. we have an exciting lineup of shows this year. and one of them, today, is going to be really exciting because we have a terrific guest today. mr. woody labounty. >> thank you. >> woody is the founder of the outside lands? >> the western neighborhoods project. we'll talk more about that. >> excellent. and the author of a recently published book, which i have a
on the environment meeting for certain issues related to the urban forestry council and have run into tireless activists from other areas of the city. one of the people i have come to know is dr. espinola jackson from the bayview district. she has great concerns about environmental justice for the people in her exhausted. community. speaking of the bayview district, after december 2011, i found myself to be the only councilmember ~ who attended mayor lee's press meeting to applaud the efforts of the neighbors who worked on the model block project on newcomb avenue. it may be tough for somebody on the urban forestry council to attend these events who has another job. i think to the greatest extent possible since we are automobile volunteers, a community seat member should go out and look at what other people in the neighborhood are doing. i have staffed the usc urban paper table to field questions and concerns from the public. i am also the only person, by the way, who has a landmark tree on the council. i work with scientists, experts from state university and my arborists to plead my case, an
? >> i do. what the united states is offer something a more stable environment. yes, of course, it's sluggish growth. and it also offers something call dividend. if you have bank deposits that will now be uninsured, where can you put your money? in the united states we have limits as well in terms of how much federal insurance we cover deposits. but if you put your assets in a company stock that has a solid balance sheet. yes, you will get flexuation but the dividend is a nice alternative rather than waking up and the government telling you that you lose 30% of your money. >> that woultd be a bad wake up call. so, now, check out the yahoo! finance question of the day. how are you positioning the international holdings in your portfolio? we'll bring you the results later in the show. let's go to josh with the market flash. >> check out thetanking now. the analysts saying that they are gaining on check point. conversations indicate a marketed increase in share losses in the past several months. sue, back to you. >> thank you very much. it's risk off today. we're off 116 points right
of the economy because we have a different value set that cares about the commitment to the environment almost any company started by a millennial has some kind of social back to it in some way. it's a commitment to being green or whether it is actually baked into the mission of the company and this is a generation that is sent by teeing homes, they are not getting married, the lowest car ownership l long time, these are the basic fundamental concept of the economy. no one has ever fought about what if people suddenly didn't think it was valuable to buy a home for a long time we faced our economy on homeownership, marriage and of these kind of things, so i'm not an economist, so i don't know how that is actually going to transform the economy but it is something that economists should be paying a lot more attention to when we talk about young people not having a bright future and people are incredibly pessimistic about this generation to have a future it is because with homeownership and marriage and so all those things are being delayed but those are different. a generation interested in crea
and large it hurts people. it hurts the environment. it takes from the poor gives to the rich. >> it is not true. business has lifted more people out of poverty in the last 200 years than anything that ever existed. business is a great value coordinator. the intellectuals they captured the naturety. that's greedy exploit tate tive and that narrative needs to be challenged and changed. >> your book is called conscious capitalism meaning most of the people in business aren't conscious of -- >> apparently not. they are not conscious of the great value they are creating. they are always on the offensive not able to articulate why business is good and how it is making the world a better place. >> what you are doing with whole foods some call it lefty silly feel good nonsense. what does it have to do with conscious capitalism. you sold people on whole foods as if it was better. >> no one is forced to trade with our company. there is competitive alternatives in the marketplace. they believe they are getting value and exchange. >> you have questions or comments from john mackey please
of the internet has produced an environment in which many people spend many hours each day online. 's this context, a person electronics communications encompass much more than in 1986. 2013, a person's the electronic communications encompass much more than in 2000 when congress acknowledge that must -- much had changed. a reform must be undertaken so that, despite the evolution of technology and its use in the world, the constitutional protections will endure. to advance ofded the goal of supporting the goal of new technologies and services. those must be and will be upheld as this lot is improved. there are many investigations in which it is working well. pedophiles who sexually assault children and put videos on the internet arethe becoming increasingly savvy. investigators use court orders under ecpa to identify these offenders to uncover caches of child pornography stored remotely in the cloud. ecpa reform is one of the top priorities. technology will help us solve many of the pressing problems our nation currently facing. we need to make sure our efforts are focused on creating incentives th
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